Tuesday, January 13, 2009

Serpentes surreptitious Kitsune Sutras

Sutra by ~aureath
I love this find over at Flowy's place

Kitsune (狐, Kitsune? IPA: [kitsɯne])( Pronunciation) (help·info) is the Japanese word for fox. Foxes are a common subject of Japanese folklore; kitsune usually refers to them in this context. Stories depict them as intelligent beings and as possessing magical abilities that increase with their age and wisdom. Foremost among these is the ability to assume human form. While some folktales speak of kitsune employing this ability to trick others—as foxes in folklore often do—other stories portray them as faithful guardians, friends, lovers, and wives.
Foxes and human beings lived in close proximity in
ancient Japan; this companionship gave rise to legends about the creatures. Kitsune have become closely associated with Inari, a Shinto kami or spirit, and serve as his messengers. This role has reinforced the fox's supernatural significance. The more tails a kitsune has—they may have as many as nine—the older, wiser, and more powerful it is. Because of their potential power and influence, some people make offerings to them as to a deity.

Serpentes by ~aureath

Kitsune are commonly portrayed as lovers, usually in stories involving a young human male and a kitsune who takes the form of a human woman.[53] The kitsune may be a seductress, but these stories are more often romantic in nature.[54] Typically, the young man unknowingly marries the fox, who proves a devoted wife. The man eventually discovers the fox's true nature, and the fox-wife is forced to leave him. In some cases, the husband wakes as if from a dream, filthy, disoriented, and far from home. He must then return to confront his abandoned family in shame.

Kenichi Hoshine

8 comments:

kitsuneflowy said...

Mursty Kitsune...

Other kitsune use their magic for the benefit of their companion or hosts as long as the human beings treat them with respect.

As yōkai, however, kitsune do not share human morality, and a kitsune who has adopted a house in this manner may, for example, bring its host money or items that it has stolen from the neighbors.

Accordingly, common households thought to harbor kitsune are treated with suspicion.[48]

Oddly, samurai families were often reputed to share similar arrangements with kitsune, but these foxes were considered zenko and the use of their magic a sign of prestige.[49]

Abandoned homes were common haunts for kitsune.[12] One 12th-century story tells of a minister moving into an old mansion only to discover a family of foxes living there. They first try to scare him away, then claim that the house "has been ours for many years, and . . . we wish to register a vigorous protest." The man refuses, and the foxes resign themselves to moving to an abandoned lot nearby.[50]

Tales distinguish kitsune gifts from kitsune payments.

If a kitsune offers a payment or reward that includes money or material wealth, part or all of the sum will consist of old paper, leaves, twigs, stones, or similar valueless items under a magical illusion.[51][52]

True kitsune gifts are usually intangibles, such as protection, knowledge, or long life.[52]

Wishing you a long, happy life Akira/Akubi...

Anonymous said...

Bonsai! Murstaramasutra on the day of the Kitsunesan y les quiero dar cuenta de que ya ha visto el sol Glorianna Sosa de Rivera (5.9 lbs) a las 14:35 hrs en el amancer de una nueva epoca.

Anonymous said...

Flowy you...luv ya

hgf said...

,,,,,,,Happyglowyflowy,,,,,,,

Sleepyflowy said...

Sleepysleepall

happyflowy said...

Dreams of rivers flowing with magic...

Happy magic Akira/Akubi...

magicflowy said...

I love it...

http://www.booooooom.com/2009/01/14/kenichi-hoshine/

edgarflowy said...

We have foxes around here, both kinds, two and four leeged. ;)